Stritch Students Taking Part in Washington March

News Archive March 17, 2010

Stritch Students Taking Part in Washington March

Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine Students Join Health Care Workers from Across the Nation in Support of Patients
Eight Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine students will join hundreds of health care professionals from across the country in a march to support patients in the fight for health-care reform. “We all have different ideas about how health care needs to be reformed, but we are united in knowing that our current system is broken and something has to be done to fix it,” said Nate Kittle, second-year medical student at Stritch. “That’s what this march is all about. It’s about being advocates for our patients and making sure they get the care they need.” The students will be joining doctors, nurses, dentists, pharmacists and other health-care workers who will march from the White House down Pennsylvania Avenue to Capitol Hill on Monday, March 22nd. Part of the mission of Stritch is to train physicians to not only be excellent clinicians, but advocates for their patients, understanding a patient is more than an illness and treating the whole person. “This debate will greatly impact my future and who knows what health care will look like in 20 years, but everyone should have access to health care. No matter our ideas or party lines this is something we can all come together on,” said Kittle. Students start drive to Washington on Saturday, March 20th at 4:00 pm.
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is located in a state-of-the-art educational facility on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood. The school, which provides instruction to 520 medical students, has been in the vanguard of institutions that have created new, active learning curricula to help students meet the challenges of 21st century health care. An estimated 8,000 to 9,000 students compete each year for 130 openings in the Stritch medical school's first-year class. In addition to the more than 500 students, Loyola's medical educational programs provide instruction and training to an estimated 400 residents and 100 fellows.
© 2011 Loyola University Chicago Health Sciences Division. All rights reserved.  &npsp; Privacy Policy   Privacy Policy