Loyola Honors Service-Minded Leaders James O’Connor, Philip Sheridan Sr., MD, and Philip Sheridan Jr., MD

News Archive November 03, 2010

Loyola Honors Service-Minded Leaders James O’Connor, Philip Sheridan Sr., MD, and Philip Sheridan Jr., MD

Sheridans and O’Connor to be Lauded at 60th Annual Stritch Award Dinner
Maywood, Ill. — In recognition of their exceptional leadership and service, for only the second time in 60 years Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine will honor three outstanding individuals at the 60th Annual Award Dinner, to be held Friday, Nov. 19, at the Hilton Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave. The Sword of Loyola, given by Loyola University Chicago, will be bestowed on James J. O’Connor, a Chicago business leader and philanthropist. Philip H. Sheridan Sr., MD, and his son Philip H. Sheridan Jr., MD, will receive the medical school’s Stritch Medal. This is only the second time in the dinner’s history that two people will share this honor and it is the first time a father and son will jointly receive the Stritch Medal. As part of the evening’s events, more than 30 young adults from the Chicago area will be recognized for their participation in the Stritch Junior Service League, a long-standing volunteer organization that carries on Loyola’s tradition of service to the community. For the first time in the history of the award, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine will present its highest honor, the Stritch Medal, jointly to a father and son, Dr. Philip H. Sheridan Sr. and Dr. Philip H. Sheridan Jr. This year’s recipients have exemplified distinction in medical care as well as the Jesuit ideal of service to others. “The Sheridans’ dedication to Catholic medical education has been vital to Stritch. We not only thank them for their unyielding support but the example of excellence in their medical professions and hearts for service that we hope our students will emulate,” said Richard L. Gamelli, MD, FACS, dean, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine. Catholic education has played a vital role in the life of Philip Sheridan Sr. He attended Fenwick High School in Oak Park, Ill., graduated from Loyola University Chicago and earned his medical degree from Stritch. While in medical school, he married the love of his life, Elizabeth J. Barnes, and they have three children. He completed residency training in general surgery at Cook County Hospital and later joined the staff at St. Francis Hospital in Evanston, Ill. While there he co-founded the Galvin Heart Center and held the position of chief of staff. He continued his affiliation with Stritch as an assistant clinical professor in the Department of Surgery. His service to others reaches far beyond American shores. He has been a member of numerous medical mission trips, including one in which he brought his whole family to Tunisia, Africa, where he served aboard the ship Project Hope, a World War II ship turned surgery center. Following in his father’s footsteps, Philip Sheridan Jr. believes medicine is more than a profession—it is a calling to serve others. “The Sheridans’ compassion for others is inspirational. They truly live out the ideals of the Stritch Medal as well as the Ignatian principles we so value here at Loyola,” said Paul K. Whelton, MD, president and CEO, Loyola University Health System. Dr. Phillip Sheridan Jr. earned his medical degree from Stritch and completed a residency in internal medicine and a fellowship in pulmonary/critical care at Loyola University Hospital. He also earned an MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. Following residency, Philip Sheridan Jr. married Nancy Croghan. They have seven children who are carrying on the family’s legacy of compassion and service. He is a pulmonologist specializing in critical-care management, bringing compassionate care to patients across the Chicago area, including Gottlieb Memorial Hospital, part of the Loyola University Health System. Selfless service has been an important part of his life. It began at age 6 when he accompanied his parents on a trip to Africa. Though international service remained dear to his heart, Dr. Sheridan Jr. decided that with a growing family he would find ways to help those in need closer to home. Hearing of the tragic asthma-related deaths in Chicago neighborhoods, he worked with his dad to develop Mobile CARE, a program that provides free comprehensive asthma care and education in Chicago’s underserved communities. Today, Mobile CARE operates three asthma vans in partnership with Chicago Public Schools, Chicago Archdiocesan Schools and Head Start programs that bring asthma care and education to kids and families throughout the city. Sword Recipient James J. O’Connor The Sword of Loyola recognizes notable achievements of outstanding leaders for contributions in a field other than medicine. This year’s recipient is Mr. James J. O’Connor. “Since 1964 the recipients of the Sword of Loyola have personified excellence in leadership and service. Jim’s passionate commitment and service to Catholic education and his innumerable contributions to the civic and business life of Chicago make him an extraordinarily worthy recipient of the Sword of Loyola,” said Fr. Michael J. Garanzini, S.J., president, Loyola University Chicago. A native of Chicago, O’Connor is the retired chairman and chief executive officer of Unicom Corp. and its subsidiary, Commonwealth Edison Co. Currently, he is the chairman of the board for Armstrong World Industries and director of Corning Inc., Smurfit-Stone Container Corp. and United Continental Holdings, Inc. Just as distinguished as his stellar business leadership is his zeal and selfless service to bettering the community and the lives of others. O’Connor has served as chairman and director of numerous Chicago-area charities including the Field Museum, the Joffrey Ballet of Chicago, the Chicago Urban League and the Chicagoland Chamber of Commerce. He is a trustee of the Adler Planetarium, the Chicago Symphony, the Lyric Opera and the Museum of Science & Industry. Currently, he serves as co-chairman of the Big Shoulders Fund, which works to improve access and programs in the 93 inner-city Catholic schools, supporting nearly 25,000 students. A founding member of the charity, O’Connor has served as co-chairman since its inception. His philanthropic efforts as director of the Helen V. Brach Foundation have promoted social justice, conservation of the environment, advanced education and public health endeavors and provided protection to some of the most vulnerable in our society, including children and animals. James and his wife, Ellen, raised four children, Fred, James, John and Elizabeth, in Evanston, Ill. They have passed on their commitment to creating a better world to them. As Chicago’s oldest black-tie gala, the legendary Stritch Annual Awards Dinner has raised millions since the event was first held in 1950. Individual tickets are $600 and tables of 10 can be sponsored for $6,000 or $12,000 and are a tax-deductible charitable donation to the extent allowed by law. For more information or to purchase tickets, contact Lara Jenkins at (708) 216-8531. For media inquiries, please contact Evie Polsley at epolsley@lumc.edu or call (708) 216-5313.
Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine is located in a state-of-the-art educational facility on the campus of Loyola University Medical Center, 2160 S. First Ave., Maywood. The school, which provides instruction to 520 medical students, has been in the vanguard of institutions that have created new, active learning curricula to help students meet the challenges of 21st century health care. An estimated 8,000 to 9,000 students compete each year for 130 openings in the Stritch medical school's first-year class. In addition to the more than 500 students, Loyola's medical educational programs provide instruction and training to an estimated 400 residents and 100 fellows.
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